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bookreview

Forget Me Not, A. M. Taylor

Posted in Books
on 03/01/2019

A double murder-mystery with a twist I didn’t predict? Yes, please! Check out my thoughts on Forget Me Not by A. M. Taylor.

Thank you to Killer Reads for a free e-copy of this book via NetGalley. A quick heads up for you, there are affiliate links within this post that, should you purchase anything through them, I will earn commission. This is at no extra charge to you.

Cover of Forget Me Not which follows Maddie as she tries to solve her best friends disappearance.

Title: Forget Me Not

Author: A. M. Taylor

Pages: 336

What happened to Nora?


On 8 January 2008, Nora’s car was found abandoned on a highway – she was never found. Fast forward 10 years, and we meet Maddie, Nora’s best friend, who has returned to her home town for the 10 year anniversary of Nora’s disappearance.

Sad times. It gets worse.

Nora disappeared when she was 17. On the exact same day, 10 years later, Nora’s now 17 year old sister is found murdered almost in the exact same spot as the car was found all those years ago.

And so begins Maddie’s journey to build friendships that were decimated by grief, to rebuild herself and to find the killer.

Thoughts

Forget Me Not follows the same beats as most murder/mystery books out there. It’s written using a combination of prose and news paper articles which is great way to build up a bit more of picture of the state in which the main characters are situated and to deliver those little clues that those who read this type of book adore.We’d all been there before and yet familiarity doesn’t always mean

I loved the resolution. I really didn’t see it coming until it was basically happening. However, I can’t help but feel a bit disappointed. I think this is mostly due to the pacing. The resolution happens in maybe the last 10% of the book with tidbits coming in at about 50% through. This spacing felt a little off to me.

It also doesn’t help that the reason why the entire thing happened is the most stereotypical. I won’t spoil it for you, but if you’ve read more than two murder/mystery books, you’ll probably get it in three guesses.

That being said, I think the character development throughout the book is fantastic. You get to know Maddie and several other characters really well. The flashbacks, which were italicised, took a little while to get used to but ultimately really shook up the way in which you read the book and absolutely tested my memory and clue-finding skills!

Ultimately, Forget Me Not was a good, standard murder/mystery read. If you’re looking for something a bit more innovative, this isn’t your book but a nice easy read on a rainy Sunday? Absolutely.

What are you reading at the moment? If you need some thoughts, check out my most anticipated reads of 2019

The Proposal, S. E. Lynes

Posted in Books
on 08/10/2018

I love a good thriller, especially the ones that keep you guessing. The Proposal by S.E Lynnes is absolutely one of those books.

Thank you to Bookouture for a free e-copy of this book via NetGalley. For complete transparency, there are affiliate links within this post.

As you were.

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Title: The Proposal

Author: S. E. Lynes

Page count: 324

The first thing you should know, dear reader, is that I am dead.

And so The Proposal begins. The book is set out in a series of blog posts and diary entries written by author, and lead character, Pippa Gates. After an encounter with a door-to-door salesman who sells her his life story for £200. Intrigued yet?

Lynes keeps you on your toes throughout the book, leading you in different directions away from your assumptions. Just over half way through, the twist comes and, boy, is it a good’un! From there, the story descends into organised chaos (in a good way!) until the dark and foreshadowed ending.

This book is a masterpiece in suspense. As a murder/thriller junkie, I didn’t see the twist coming. I was delighted when my assumed twist was completely wrong! It shocked me, made me scroll back to an earlier chapter to find the clues, and then smile like an idiot when I realised I’d been played. Honestly, such a good twist!

The writing style is fantastic. There’s a clear difference between the diary entries and the blog posts. There’s a narrative being played out here. The overly happy, perfect life portrayed in the blog posts is beautifully contrasted by the dark, twisted reality portrayed in the diary.

Have you read The Proposal? What did you think? If not, does it sound like one for you?

Vox, Christina Dalcher

Posted in Books
on 03/09/2018

“I don’t think I really believed it would happen. I don’t think any of us did.”

IMG_0193Title: Vox

Author: Christina Dalcher

Page count: 326 (hardcover edition)

Imagine a world where women have a 100-word allowance each day. Go over that number, and you’ll wish you hadn’t.

That’s the reality for Dr, no, Mrs Jean McClellan, and all girls & women over 3 months old. No title, other than the one of ownership; no voting; no work but housework; no words, no signing, no gestures; no privacy. Not even any mail. The band around their wrist, calibrated to their voice, counts upwards throughout the day, enforcing quietness and submission to male dominance. And then, as if by total irony, the research Jean had been working on (until she couldn’t) was needed, beginning the fight for the right to have a voice.

Dalcher has created a masterful piece of literature, which uniquely combines the politics and turbulence of external factors, with family dynamics, not all of them good. Jean has to raise four kids, three boys and a girl, whilst adjusting to life within this new, intolerant country. Her husband, Patrick, works in the White House and is so wonderfully complex as a character, I could write a whole post on the mastery of it. It would, however, give away some major spoilers so I will save that for a time when people know how this book ends.

Add into this, Dalcher’s fantastic use of intersectional politics and identities, and there’s an element of this novel that makes you terrified for the future. The hints of Bible Belt religionism, nuclear family discourse, and corrupt politics make this book incredibly exciting and fast-paced. My one criticism – stylistically, it might have been a bit more impactful for each chapter to be 100 words or less.

That doesn’t really limit my love for this book, though.

Have you read Vox? What did you think? If you haven’t got a copy yet, you can pick one up here (not an affiliated link – I just love people buying books!)